Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the SQL database
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Troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the SQL database

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Article ID: 341668

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Updated On:

Products

VMware

Issue/Introduction

This article provides details on troubleshooting VMware App Volumes using the SQL database.

Environment

VMware App Volumes 2.6.0
VMware App Volumes 2.9.x
VMware App Volumes 2.5.x
VMware App Volumes 2.7.x

Resolution

The SQL database keeps track of the system state in an App Volumes environment. You can investigate the SQL database and its contents to aid in troubleshooting an App Volumes issue.
 
To access the SQL database, you must be logged into the App Volumes Manager server. You can use a locally installed instance of SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS) or SQL Server Management Studio Express (SSMSE) to access the App Volumes Manager database.
 

Confirming the App Volumes SQL Database Name

To confirm the name of the App Volumes SQL database, you can check SSMS or SSMSE. For more information, see Microsoft article View a List of Databases on an Instance of SQL Server.
 
You can also check the SQL database name in the registry settings on the App Volumes Manager server:
 
Launch regedit.exe, and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_Machine\Software\Wow6432Node\CloudVolumes\Manager
 
The Database key contains the SQL database name.
 
Note: For more information on App Volumes registry settings, see Confirming VMware App Volumes environment information from registry entries (2125612).
 

Connecting to the App Volumes SQL Database

Note: The following procedure uses SQL Server Management Studio. You can also use SQL Server Management Studio Express to access the SQL database.
 
  1. Launch SQL Server Management Studio. Go to Start > SQL Server Management Studio.
  2. Click File, and then click Connect to Server.
  3. Type the App Volumes Manager database name, and type the database login credentials.
  4. Click Connect. You are connected to the database.

    Note:To ensure connection to the database, in the Object Explorer pane on the left, expand the App Volumes database name. If the database name is present, the connection is successful.
 
 

Troubleshooting tips using the App Volumes SQL Database

After you connect to the SQL database, expand the Tables folder for a list of SQL database tables to examine.
 
Here are examples of SQL database tables to check when troubleshooting an App Volumes environment:
 
 
dbo.log_records
 
Query the table dbo.log_records to see successful and failed tasks. Right-click dbo.log_records and select Select Top 1000 Rows.
 
 
 
 
If a user cannot see any applications on their desktop, it may be due to a failed disk mount. In this scenario, you can query the BIOS_UUID values in the App Volumes database against the BIOS_UUID values in the vCenter Server database.
 
 
dbo.machines
 
Each machine with the App Volumes Agent has an identifier and BIOS_UUID value in the dbo.machines table in the App Volumes database. The Agent uses the BIOS_UUID for all queries and disk mount requests.
 
 
 
dbo.VPX_VM
 
The BIOS_UUID value from dbo.machines is sent to the vCenter Server where there is a corresponding virtual machine in the dbo.VPX_VM table in the vCenter database. If vCenter Server cannot find the matching BIOS_UUID after 5 minutes, a timeout occurs, and the user is presented with a virtual machine with no AppStacks attached.
 

Page last Reviewed: 12/30/2022
Next Review Due: 12/30/2024


Additional Information

Confirming VMware App Volumes environment information from registry entries
SQL データベースを使用した VMware App Volumes のトラブルシューティング