search cancel

How to clone or save an image file over a TCP/IP peer to peer connection

book

Article ID: 151709

calendar_today

Updated On:

Products

Ghost Solution Suite

Issue/Introduction

You want to use Ghost's TCP/IP option to create an image of a disk or partition and save it as a file on another computer or write it over a disk or partition on another computer. Both computers have a network interface card (NIC).
 

Resolution

Transmitting an image over a TCP/IP peer-to-peer connection is similar to using Ghost.exe with GhostCast Server or Ghost Multicast Server because both processes use a TCP/IP connection. The difference is that the peer-to-peer connection uses a Master/Slave relationship, and the server uses a one-to-many relationship.
Note: For information on other ways to clone between two computers, see the document Using Ghost to save or write an image to a different computer.


To clone a disk or partition over a TCP/IP peer-to-peer connection, first create a Network Boot Disk, and then run Ghost at each computer from the Network Boot Disk.

Norton Ghost 2003
Norton Ghost 2003 has an option to start Ghost from within Windows, rather than from a bootable floppy disk. To start Ghost from within Windows, see the document How to start Ghost from Windows to clone between two computers. Use the instructions in that document in place of the following steps 1, 2, and 4.

To clone a disk or partition over a TCP/IP peer-to-peer connection
  1. To create a Network Boot Disk, click Start > Programs > Symantec Ghost or Norton Ghost > Ghost Boot Wizard.
    For Symantec Ghost 8.x and 7.5, choose Network Boot Disk.
    For Norton Ghost 2003 and 2002, choose Peer-to-Peer Network Boot Disk.
  2. Follow the prompts.
  3. Boot up each computer from the Network Boot Disk.
    If using a DHCP server, you can use the same floppy disk to run Ghost on both computers. Otherwise, use a different Network Boot Disk for each computer, so that each disk uses a different IP address.
  4. Determine which computer will be the master computer and which computer will be the slave.
    The master is the computer from which you control the connection. After you have started Ghost on each computer and selected Master or Slave, all operator input must be on the master computer.
    When creating and saving an image file or writing an image over the contents of another disk or partition, the source computer should be the Master and the destination computer should be the Slave. When restoring a disk image or a partition image, the destination drive should be the Master and the source drive should be the Slave.
    WARNING: This relationship is very important; if the wrong computer is set as Master or Slave, it can cause data loss on the drive you intend to copy. Be certain which computer is the Master and which is the Slave. For further clarification, see the section "Assigning the Master and Slave computers."
  5. Start Ghost at each computer.
    If you used Ghost Boot Wizard to create the Network Boot Disk or if you added a line for the Ghost executable file to the Autoexec.bat file on the Network Boot Disk, Ghost is already started. If Ghost is not in the Autoexec.bat, start Ghost by typing the file name at the A:\> prompt, as follows:

    Ghost.exe

    For Ghost 2001 and 2002, type Ghostpe.exe instead of Ghost.exe.
To configure the Slave computer
  1. Select TCP/IP.
  2. Select Slave. Ghost displays the message:

    "Attempting to connect via TCP/IP. Use IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx in master to connect to the slave machine."

    where xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx is the IP address of the slave computer. Ghost monitors the TCP/IP port on this computer for signals from the other computer. If it does not receive a signal before the end of the time-out period, Ghost will display the message "Timeout - Failed to connect."
  3. If using a static IP address, enter the IP address of the master computer.

To configure Master computer:
  1. Select TCP/IP.
  2. While the slave computer is displaying the message "Attempting to connect via TCP/IP port...," select Master.
  3. Type the IP address of the Slave computer. Ghost displays the message:

    "Attempting to connect via TCP/IP. Use IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx in slave to connect to the master machine."

    at the master computer. In the message, xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx, is the IP address of the master computer. Note that if you do not select Master soon enough, the slave computer displays the message "Timeout - Failed to connect" and the Ghost master computer cannot make a connection with the Ghost slave computer.
  4. If using a static IP address, enter the IP address of the slave computer.
  5. Choose the type of cloning operation that you want to perform.
    To create an image file and save the file, choose the options Disk-to-Image or Partition-to-Image.
    To write the contents of an image file over a disk or partition, choose the options Image-to-Disk or Image-to-Partition.
    To write a disk or partition directly to another disk or partition, choose the options Partition-to-Partition or Disk-to-Disk.
  6. Follow the on-screen prompts.


Assigning the Master and Slave computers
When cloning a disk or partition, the source computer is the Master and the destination computer is the Slave. When restoring an image, the computer that has the image is the Slave and the computer that you will restore the image to is the Master.
 
Cloning operation
Master
Slave

Cloning: Copy the disk or partition

Disk-To-Disk

Computer containing the source disk

Computer containing the destination disk

Partition-To-Partition

Computer containing the source partition

Computer containing the destination partition

Cloning: Create an image file

Disk-To-Image

Computer containing the source disk

Computer receiving the image file

Partition-To-Image

Computer containing the source partition

Computer receiving the image file

Restore an image

Image-To-Disk

Computer containing the destination disk

Computer containing the image file

Image-To-Partition

Computer containing the destination partition

Computer containing the image file


More information

A Network Boot Disk is a bootable floppy disk that loads the drivers for the network interface card (NIC) and runs Ghost.exe or Ghostpe.exe. Symantec Ghost 6.5 Enterprise Edition, Symantec Ghost 7.0, Symantec Ghost 7.5, Symantec Ghost 8.x, and Norton Ghost 2003 use Ghost.exe. Norton Ghost 2001 and Norton Ghost 2002 use Ghostpe.exe.
 
Note: Ghost versions 6.04 and earlier called this floppy disk the Ghost Multicast Client boot disk. When you see references to the Ghost Multicast Client boot disk, you can substitute the phrase "Network Boot Disk" as long as you are currently using a Ghost version that includes Ghost Boot Wizard.


Ghost connection problems through a TCP/IP peer-to-peer connection are usually due to improper DOS drivers or an incorrect setup for the IP address. If Ghost cannot make or keep a connection between the two computers, check the following:

DOS drivers
The Network Boot Disk requires the proper DOS drivers for the NIC. Ghost supplies the DOS drivers for many popular NICs and lists the NICs in Ghost Boot Wizard.
DHCP and IP address
One of the most common mistakes made when creating a Network Boot Disk for a TCP/IP peer-to-peer connection is to use the default option for DHCP when the computer is on a home network. This can cause a variety of errors regarding DHCP or IP addresses and prevents each computer from "seeing" the other computer.

Typically, this happens when the network does not have a DHCP server and you chose the DHCP option in Ghost Boot Wizard. A DHCP server assigns IP addresses to computers on the network, and Ghost uses these IP addresses to identify the computers to each other. If there is no DHCP server and you have not provided an IP address for each computer, each computer running Ghost cannot "find" the other computer that is running Ghost.

To prevent the problem, use Ghost Boot Wizard to create two Network Boot Disks, one for each computer. For both disks, choose Static IP Address instead of DHCP. When Boot Wizard asks for an IP address, enter any number within the subnet mask. Use a different number for each Network Boot Disk, and make a note of the number in each case.

When you run Ghost.exe or Ghostpe.exe and choose TCP/IP as the connection type, Ghost requires that you enter the IP address of the other computer.

Static IP addresses and the subnet mask
IP addresses are categorized by classes such as Class C or Class B. The number that is used as the subnet mask depends on the class and on the number of subnets on the network.

Ghost operations that use TCP/IP peer-to-peer connections are typically run on networks that do not use subnets. For networks that do not have subnets, use 255.255.255.0 as the subnet mask on a Class C network. Similarly, use 255.255.0.0 for Class B and 255.0.0.0 for Class A.

For the static IP address of each computer, use an IP number that is not already in use and is not otherwise invalid. If the network does not use subnets, the IP address should be unique on the network. If the network uses subnets, the IP address should be unique on the subnet.

For instance, the following two IP addresses might work on a typical network that uses Class C addresses:
192.168.0.1
192.168.0.2
Ghost automatically saves the static IP address and Subnet Mask on the Network Boot Disk when you use the Static IP Address option in Ghost Boot Wizard. Ghost saves these in the Wattcp.cfg file that is in the Ghost directory on the Network Boot Disk. To add a static IP address manually, edit Wattcp.cfg to add a line for the IP address and the Subnet Mask. For instance, Wattcp.cfg might have the following entries:

IP=123.123.123.123
NETMASK=255.255.255.0

PnP OS setting in the computer's BIOS
When the computer's BIOS is set to Yes for the PnP OS (Plug and Play Operating System) option, DOS might be unable to access the network interface card (NIC). When DOS cannot access the NIC, Ghost cannot establish a connection over TCP/IP.

To resolve this problem, disable the PnP OS option in the computer's BIOS before using Ghost. After you've completed creating an image file, restoring an image file, or doing a disk-to-disk clone, enable the PnP OS option before restarting the computer. It might also be helpful to make a note on your Ghost boot floppy disk that Ghost requires the PnP OS option to be disabled on this computer.





References
More driver information

For more information on Network Boot Disks and NIC drivers, see the document Introduction to creating a Ghost Network Boot Disk.
For information on PCMCIA network interface cards, see the document Ghost compatibility with PCMCIA devices.


 

 

Attachments